BYU Football with Kalani Sitake airs in just 30 minutes! Tune in at 8pm ET on BYUtv and submit your questions here using #byutvsports and #SitakeShow for a chance to have your question asked on the air.

BYU Football with Kalani Sitake airs in just 30 minutes! Tune in at 8pm ET on BYUtv and submit your questions here using #byutvsports and #SitakeShow for a chance to have your question asked on the air.— BYUtv Sports (@byutvsports) September 4, 2018

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Continue reading “BYU Football with Kalani Sitake airs in just 30 minutes! Tune in at 8pm ET on BYUtv and submit your questions here using #byutvsports and #SitakeShow for a chance to have your question asked on the air.”

McFarland Mall

McFarland Mall was a regional L-shaped shopping mall on Skyland Boulevard (U.S. Route 11) in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Located near the interchange of Interstate 20/59 with McFarland Boulevard (U.S. Route 82), it was in the southern section of the city. Opening on February 19, 1969, the mall replaced Woods Square Shopping Center and Leland Shopping Center as the main commercial retail center in the Tuscaloosa area. Brandon Crawford and Associates of Birmingham was the architect for the mall. General contractor for the project was N.C. Morgan Construction Company of Tuscaloosa. McGiffert and Associates of Tuscaloosa provided the engineering services for the mall.
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Morotai Mutiny

The “Morotai Mutiny” was an incident in April 1945 involving members of the Australian First Tactical Air Force based on the island of Morotai, in the Dutch East Indies. Eight senior pilots, including Australia’s leading flying ace, Group Captain Clive Caldwell, tendered their resignations to protest what they perceived as the relegation of Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) fighter squadrons to strategically unimportant ground attack missions against Japanese positions that had been bypassed in the Allies’ “island-hopping” campaign. A government investigation vindicated the “mutineers”, and three high-ranking officers at First Tactical Air Force Headquarters, including the commander, Air Commodore Harry Cobby, the Australian Flying Corps’ top-scoring ace during World War I, were relieved of their posts.
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